Finding Fire Princess

Finding Fire Princess

A mysterious gift leads to an investigation of a front-page, 1929 double suicide–or was it murder-suicide?–of Josephine Rotch, a young Boston bride, and Harry Crosby, an eccentric Paris poet, both married, but not to each other. A series of serendipitous events lead to the discovery of a motive, which has been missing for 80 years.

This true story is the back story to the screenplay, Fire Princess, which tells the never-before-told tale of Harry Crosby, a self-proclaimed death cultist, and the woman who–to the surprise of all–died in his arms.

Caresse Crosby from “Always Yes, Caresse,” 1962

Caresse Crosby from “Always Yes, Caresse,” 1962

A clip from “Always Yes, Caresse”, about Caresse Crosby from 1962, at her estate Castello di Rocca Siniblada north of Rome, Italy. She bought the run-down castle containing more than 200 rooms for a little more than $2000. She turned it into an artists colony. The short film featured her guests and their artistic and literary efforts. Caresse, born Mary Phelps Jacob in Boston, Massachusetts, was a patron of the arts, poet, publisher, and peace activist. She published the early works, before they were famous, of Hart Crane, D. H. Lawrence, James Joyce, T. S. Eliot, and others.